Blog

Regaining Custody After Disavowing Children

Daniel Noffsinger - Monday, May 29, 2017

Once parental responsibilities are established, a change generally only occurs if there is a material change in circumstance with the children or the custodial parent or with the parents’ consent, and the proposed change is in the best interest of the children. Sometimes, a parent may disavow his or her children, disappear from their lives for a period of time, and then try to reestablish contact to become a parent once more at a later date. Many courts do not like this behavior because of the emotional impact and lasting effect the abandonment has on the children.  READ MORE...

What Can You Do if Your Spouse Takes an Extreme Position During Divorce or Family Law Proceedings: An Inspired Approach (Part 1)

Daniel Noffsinger - Wednesday, September 21, 2016

The first known use of the phrase shuttle diplomacy was in 1974. In that year, then U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger was busy traveling back and forth among Middle Eastern nations, in an effort to help the nation states solve their disputes. Unable or unwilling to communicate with each other, the nation states relied on Kissinger to state each side’s position to the other side. Despite his attempts Kissinger, was unable to broker a lasting solution to the problems the nation states had with each other.  READ MORE...

International Child Custody Disputes

Daniel Noffsinger - Monday, February 29, 2016

At the heart of international child custody disputes is the issue of relocation. As people are more mobile, when relationships fall apart, relocation may be necessary to accommodate a new job or family. Oftentimes, either at the time of separation or after divorce, a lawyer hears from prospective clients that a parent wants to move to another country, that a parent has already moved with the child and the other parent wants the child back, or that a parent doesn’t trust another country’s courts for the determination of custody issues. The parent that relocates without permission from the other parent or by court order may be accused of parental abduction or kidnapping and may lose parental rights or be subject to supervised visitation with his or her child.  READ MORE...

What Is a Legal Separation In Colorado?

Daniel Noffsinger - Saturday, November 15, 2014

What is a legal separation and how does it differ from divorce? This is a common question that individuals have when going through the divorce process. Under Colorado law, legal separation and divorce are nearly the same. The main difference between the two is that following a legal separation, a couple is still “married,” which means that if either spouse wants to remarry then the couple will first need to seek an order with the court to dissolve the marriage. This can be done no earlier than six months after entry of a legal separation decree. If, during the proceedings, one party objects to the legal separation, they can convert to a divorce case instantly.  READ MORE...

You Asked: How Much Of My Military Retirement Is My Spouse Entitled To?

Daniel Noffsinger - Saturday, June 14, 2014

Barracks lawyers. You know what I’m talking about. I was a barracks lawyer in a prior life. I literally stole a copy of the Uniform Code of Military Justice from the company office and walked around the barracks advising fellow soldiers of what their superiors “couldn’t do to them.” Turns out I was often wrong, but I think I got an A for effort.  READ MORE...